Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Old-Fashioned Artist: William A. Breakspeare


Every once in a while I come across an artist, new to me, whose work I greatly admire. Recently I found a painting at the blog British Paintings (they post paintings from mostly Victorian painters) that intrigued me. I've had such fun looking up his other paintings! 

The artist is:

William Arthur Breakspeare

British painter, 1856 - 1914


Take a look at some of his lovely works:

The Courtship



The Gypsy

A Venetian Beauty

A Toast To The Chef

If Music Be The Food Of Love

Where Are You Going To, My Pretty Maid

The Cavalier's Sword

The Musician

A Musical Interlude

The Sleeping Beauty

Outside of the Rose and Crown

A Flirtation in the Rose Garden

The Reluctant Pianist

The Gardener's Daughter 

A Bouquet of Flowers

The Pianist


Reading In The Garden

Dreaming

Newly Married   

And this painting is the one that drew my attention: 


Young Lovers

This is my favorite painting of Mr. Breakspeare's because it's like a scene straight out of a Jane Austen novel! It's filled with so much detail and beauty and it's a sweet scene of a courting couple. 


I love William Breakspeare's style of painting and the gentle lovely scenes that he's created on canvas! Each piece is touched with delightful spirit and old-fashioned charm! The titles are also sweet and add to the enchantment of the paintings so well, sometimes with a bit of poetic idea to them.



Have you ever seen the work of William Arthur Breakspeare before?
Which of these paintings is your favorite?
Which paintings have the best titles?


Very Truly Your's,

6 comments:

Cathy said...

Beautiful paintings! I've never heard of this painter.

My favorite is probably "Reading in the Garden"...two of my favorite things!

Favorite title would be "The Reluctant Pianist"...reminds me of my daughter daydreaming, when she should be practicing her piano! :)

Cathy

Chandra said...

What struck me as curious is that the subjects of almost all those paintings are from an era before the artist was born. Most seem to be Regency Era, and he wasnt born until the 1850's. This seems to suggest the subjects are all from his imagination, and therefore historical details such as costume can't be considered as a source of accuracy. Not that you were suggesting they were in your post, but the topic came to my mind while looking at them.

Ella said...

I believe I've seen his paintings before,but I don't know where.
Great post!

AJ said...

I never heard of this painter, but I certainly do enjoy his work.

My favorites are 'Reading in the Garden', 'Gardener's Daughter', and 'Newly Married'.

The paintings, whether fictional or accurate, in my opinion are quite lovely and show elegance and grace.

~Great post!~

Anonymous said...

Miss Laurie,
I'm so glad you took the time to introduce us to this artist. Such a pleasant discovery. My favorite is The Reluctant Pianist. I am sure there is a story behind that one; I wish I knew it. I also like Newly Married, not so much because of the lovely self-absorbed young couple, but mostly because of the people you notice in the background, the other onlookers like ourselves. They are probably reliving their own experiences of newly married life. (Did you notice that he is carrying her parasol?)
Kayla

Penny Whitney said...

Today I discovered that my great-great grandfather's brother Samuel Page advised Frederick Layton, founder of Milwaukee Art Museum on what to buy to show in the gallery - opened 1888. He also donated a picture to the gallery, by William Breakspeare, entitled "The Marriage Settlement". Unfortunately the picture was sold in 1960 but I will be send a photo of it! Until today I had never heard of William Breakspeare. We would call his paintings 'chocolate box' but never the less they are evocative of a bygone era. I agree with the Jane Austen comment!

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